SEO for Hotels: Is Search Engine Optimization All It's Cracked Up to Be?

SEO for Hotels: Is Search Engine Optimization All It’s Cracked Up to Be?

With more humans having access to mobile phones than ever before, it’s no wonder people rely on search engines to look for everything. With nearly 75% of travelers making reservations online coupled with a 97% of web traffic hitting page one results, it makes sense to focus on SEO, or search engine optimization, for hotels.

Still not convinced SEO for hotels is worth the while? Let’s look at how SEO impacts how you reach potential hotel customers.

1. If you’re not visible online, it’s a missed opportunity.

When was the last time you went out to a hotel or restaurant, or even a destination for vacation without checking it out online? For planners looking to book your space, if you’re out of sight, you’re likely out of mind. SEO for hotels starts with elevating your visibility online.

Planners will likely take to Google, Bing, or Yahoo to do a search for venues. Or, if they’re on the go and they’re searching on a cell phone, they’ll get results based on their location, and the places listed near them. If your property isn’t properly optimized for search, you may never be found or discovered.

SEO for Hotels: Is Search Engine Optimization All It's Cracked Up to Be?

2. SEO makes it possible to grow your brand.

You likely have some long-standing hotel partnerships right now. Whether it’s with the local convention center, food and beverage providers, or event planning companies, these are entities that can help surface your hotel brand online. When it comes to SEO for hotels, cross-branding with content and social media provide a valuable opportunity to grow your brand. Moreover, in creating link building strategies, it helps to surface both the

When it comes to SEO for hotels, cross-branding with content and social media provide a valuable opportunity to grow your brand. Moreover, in creating link building strategies, it helps to surface both your and your partner’s brand online. When external sites link to you (and vice versa), that builds your page rankings. That means your site will climb closer to those page one results on Google.

3. Staying relevant and top of mind with SEO.

It might seem like a hassle maintaining a website, creating new content then distributing it. But fresh, new content will help you in the long term.

If you’re creating content that’s relevant to planners, it’ll create an opportunity for your property to be discovered. For example, your hotel property might be a choice property for conventions. One way to surface your property as the place to stay for a convention, you could create content around making the most of your time at a convention. Or, how to balance working remote and engagement at a convention. Not only will potential guests find the content helpful, it could be a way they discover your property in an indirect way.

By creating relevant, fresh content that is helpful is the perfect opportunity to test out SEO for your hotel.

4. Competitors are vying for your search results.

Open up a new tab on your browser right now and Google your city and the word, “hotel”. Who comes up in the search results?

You’ll likely see your hotel and some competitors in the area. And if your hotel doesn’t surface at all, it’s time to get to work on your SEO. If your hotel has a niche, take advantage of what makes you different to rank for those keywords in search. Want to know just how competitive certain keywords are? Hop into Keyword Planner to see how much traffic there is. Need more ideas for keywords to try? Use a tool like Keyword.io to chart your path towards page one results.

Getting noticed on search engines and ranking is difficult, but very lucrative and rewarding. SEO for hotels is well-worth the effort and you’ll see gains, provided you put a bit of effort in.

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Laura Lopez
Laura Lopez is the Marketing Content Strategist at the Washington, D.C.-based event planning software company, Social Tables. In her role, she puts the “social” in Social Tables through facilitating face to face and digital interactions between their growing, global customer base of over 4,000 strong. She is passionate about bringing together like-minded communities that share a common goal to make each other successful through on and offline engagement.